Übersicht

http://www.ayurveda-produkte.de/musik-buecher-duefte-und-mehr/buecher-und-publikationen.html

http://www.meditation.de/transzendentale-meditation/literatur-zur-transzendentalen-meditation/

http://www.transzendentale-meditation.de/pages/mpage8.htm

http://www.mumpress.com/maharishi-books.html

http://www.mumpress.com/ebooks.html

http://issue10.tmmagazine.org/transcendental-meditation-revisited.html#books

http://jackforem.com The Essential Teachings of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi

Einzelne Bücher

http://www.amazon.com/Blue-Salon-Other-Follies-Boyhood-ebook/dp/B006ZIMODC/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1416139507&sr=1-2&keywords=vernon+katz+%2B+upanishads

The Blue Salon and Other Follies:
A Jewish Boyhood in 1930s' Rural Germany
Vernon Katz (Author)

Paperback $21.15 Kindle Edition $3.99

Product Details

File Size: 3653 KB
Print Length: 436 pages
Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
Publisher: Xlibris (August 27, 2008)
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
Language: English
ASIN: B006ZIMODC

Book Description
Publication Date: August 27, 2008

"The Blue Salon and Other Follies vividly recounts the 1930’s childhood of Vernon Katz in Lippe, Germany. Through the eyes of an observant young boy, the author reveals how Jewish life in a country town gradually eroded as the Nazis came to power. With a dry wit, the author recaptures his childhood and family life through light-hearted anecdotes and pictures, as well as dramatic events, including his mother’s escapes from imprisonment and death by the Nazis.

The title, The Blue Salon and Other Follies refers to the inability of Vernon Katz’s parents in the early years of Nazi rule to comprehend the dangers that lie ahead. Rooted in German soil and having built a successful brush factory together, they think it is all a passing phase. Fifteen months after Hitler’s rise to power, when a tribute to Vernon Katz’ father appears in a German business journal, his mother joyfully redecorates the house and creates the luxurious blue salon.

About the Author

Dr. Katz earned a fi rst class honours degree from Oxford University in politics, philosophy and economics, and was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy degree; his thesis was on Indian philosophy. The author assisted Maharishi Mahesh Yogi with his translation and commentary on the Bhagavad-Gita, which has sold over one million copies. The author's translation of the Upanishads is in progress. Vernon Katz is currently a visiting professor and a trustee at Maharishi University of Management in Iowa and resides in London.

A new historical account November 7, 2008

By Thomas Egenes

Format:Paperback

Vernon Katz's book reads like a novel, but is a true story. It's the tale of a young boy -- the author -- growing up in a small town in Germany just before World War II. Katz remembers every detail, telling charming accounts of life with his rural Jewish family. The book becomes darker as the Nazis gain power. The teachers in the school start wearing the Nazi uniform, and the young Katz must endure other children throwing stones at him as he walks to school. Still his family is loyal to Germany and hopes for the best, not realizing what was to come.

Then one morning the stones explode through the windows of their home. Later there is a knock at the door, and the police take his father away, transporting him and Katz's uncle with other Jews to Buchenwald, a concentration camp, where they are treated badly. Not long after, Katz's mother goes into hiding to escape imprisonment, and he is left alone in a large house for months.

Fortunately, he eventually gains passage on the kindertrain for England. At least for his family, there is a happy reunion in London. This book is funny, charming, and sensitive, and more than that, offers insights into what happened to rural Jewish families at that dark moment of history, seen from the eyes of an alert young man who remembered every detail even after more than half a century.

Review from AJR Journal [Association of Jewish Refugees] by Marion Koebner March 18, 2009

By J. Booth
Format:Paperback
Irresistible memoir

THE BLUE SALON AND OTHER FOLLIES

by Vernon Katz

With a title like The Blue Salon and Other Follies, you increase your chances of catching the eye of potential readers - a good start when you enter the crowded market for refugee memoirs. And, to continue the metaphor, the countless market stalls are well-stocked with any number of mature, unripe and rotten fruits of someone's labour. Not all will make it to the domestic fruit bowl, but this one should.

Vernon Katz knows how to attract the browser's attention and, having hooked him/her, how to keep it. The blue salon of the title epitomises the achingly familiar, but heart-rending, response of many German Jews of my parents' generation to the Nazi strategy to rid Germany of Jews and Jewish life.

Until Kristallnacht (for which the contemporary nomenclature in Germany is `der November Pogrom') - arguably the final wake-up call for German Jews that the Nazis meant what Hitler wrote in Mein Kampf - those Jews still living in the `Fatherland' chose to believe, for a myriad of reasons, that life would be difficult, restricted, uncomfortable - but that despite everything there would be life after Hitler.

So for Emmy Katz (Mother), having the `salon' decorated and furnished in the most tasteful way regardless of expense was - presumably subconsciously - a life-affirming act.

>From the account of his childhood in Schötmar, a small town in Lippe Detmold, to that describing the moment some 50 years later when he returns there as a visitor, Katz peoples his canvas with family members, friends and others communicating a sense of warmth and humour about the various players in his long life. The cast of characters - almost in the style of one of those long Russian novels - is listed as an appendix and photographs of many are interspersed throughout the book. The reader is drawn into this memoir not least by the contents page thanks to such irresistible chapter headings as The Fat Krakeeler and Tenants, Pigs and Plumpskloos. Who can resist?

by Marion Koebner

The Blue Salon by Dr. Vernon Katz February 23, 2009
By David W. Orme-johnson

Format:Paperback

The Blue Salon and other Follies is a beautifully written autobiographical account of a Jewish family in Germany during the rise of the Third Reich from 1933 until 1939, when they barely escaped to England. Told with wry humor, the book is a highly personal account, complete with many family photos, of a terrible chapter in human history. What makes this tale so remarkable is that it is told through the eyes of an amazingly perceptive child of five and a half to eleven who possesses a prodigious memory for detail and has subtle insights into complex human relationships.

We grow to love a large extended family, warts and all, who consider themselves "Germans of Jewish faith", tracing their German roots back to the 1600's, the earliest date in which records were kept. They cannot believe their country is turning against them, which proved to be a fatal attitude for six million people. "The evil increased by small incremental steps--ignoring, disliking, attacking, and ultimately murdering."

The small boy, Vernon, engrossed in his friends, games and favorite foods, slowly becomes engulfed by the nightmare growing around him. "My parents entrusted me with all their troubles. I knew more than what was good for me. I grew from a boy who liked hide-and-seek and Volkerball, into a little old man, and old I have remained ever since."

At the end of the day, it was about the money. What the Nazis did was create and amplify prejudice against an identifiable indigenous minority group in order to take their wealth to build their war machine. The war machine was then used to invade other countries to steal their money, resources, art, etc. and to enslave and murder their people at will. It is the age-old get-rich-quick scheme of individuals preying on other individuals, tribes attacking other tribes, majority groups assailing minority groups, nations invading other nations, all for the power and the plunder.

The little Vernon of the book went on to become, Dr. Vernon Katz, with a doctorate from Oxford University in politics, philosophy and economics.

David Orme-Johnson, Ph.D.

The Upanishads: A New Translation
by Vernon Katz and Thomas Egenes
(Tarcher Cornerstone Editions) Paperback –
(Available June 30, 2015)

by Thomas Egenes (Author), Vernon Katz (Author)
New from $11.66

This new translation of The Upanishads is at once delightfully simple and rigorously learned, providing today’s readers with an accurate, accessible rendering of the core work of ancient Indian philosophy.

The Upanishads are often considered the most important literature from ancient India. Yet many academic translators fail to capture the work’s philosophical and spiritual subtlety, while others convey its poetry at the cost of literal meaning.

This new translation by Vernon Katz and Thomas Egenes fills the need for an Upanishads that is clear, simple, and insightful – yet remains faithful to the original Sanskrit.

As Western Sanskrit scholars who have spent their lives immersed in meditative practice, Katz and Egenes offer a unique perspective in penetrating the depths of Eastern wisdom and expressing these insights in modern yet poetic language.

Their historical introduction is suited to newcomers and experienced readers alike, providing the perfect entry to this unparalleled work.

Product Details

Series: Tarcher Cornerstone Editions
Paperback: 320 pages
Publisher: Tarcher (June 30, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0399174230
ISBN-13: 978-0399174230

Vernon Katz received his doctorate from Oxford University, where he studied The Upanishads with Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, who later became president of India. Katz assisted the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, founder of Transcendental Meditation, in his classic translation of the Bhagavad Gita. Katz’s books include The Blue Salon and Other Follies, an account of growing up as a Jewish boy in Nazi Germany.

Thomas Egenes received his doctorate from the University of Virginia, after graduating from the University of Notre Dame. He is an associate professor at Maharishi University of Management. Egenes has written some of today’s leading guides for learning Sanskrit, which are used at universities in the U.S., Europe, and Australia.

http://www.amazon.com/Upanishads-Translation-Tarcher-Cornerstone-Editions/dp/0399174230/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1416139507&sr=1-1&keywords=vernon+katz+%2B+upanishads
Volume Two of Conversations with Maharishi
Der zweite Band ist jetzt auch erhältlich.

Conversations_wi_54dd0701d1b22

In this highly anticipated follow-up to Volume One of Conversations with Maharishi, we again join Dr. Vernon Katz as he sits by Maharishi’s side, and we listen in on these exhilarating conversations about the highest potential of human life. The fascinating insights into the Brahma Sutra can only be found within these pages.

In these brilliant interchanges which took place on the beautiful Mediterranean island of Mallorca and in the alpine splendour of Switzerland and France, Maharishi brings out fresh insights into his basic message of the primacy of consciousness and the unity of all things — encouraged by the discerning questions and comments of Dr. Katz. New themes in this volume bring out the analytical and philosophical aspects of Maharishi’s teaching. In this and in so much else, Maharishi has bestowed an extraordinary legacy of knowledge for all humanity.

http://www.mumpress.com/emailing/2015_02-vernon.html

Das Buch von Purusha Johannes A. Buchholz Buch steht jetzt bei Amazon:
19,50 Euro (240 Seiten) http://www.amazon.de/dp/1495943984

Leseproben aus dem Buch sind auf der Webseite http://sattvadiaet.webnode.com/ verfügbar.

Bei Amazon.com (englischer Bereich) ist das Buch in der englischen Version ebenfalls verfügbar:

http://www.amazon.com/Sattva-Di%C3%A4t-German-Edition-Johannes-Buchholz/dp/1495943984/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1392757722&sr=8-2&keywords=johannes+buchholz

Das Buch kann auch als PDF-Datei zum Preis von 18,30 Euro über seine Webseite (Kontaktformular) bestellt werden.

Buchholz: "Zuschriften mit Fragen, Kommentaren etc. nehme ich gerne an. Eventuell kann ich auch einige der Themen, die Sie anschneiden, in mein 2. Buch übernehmen."

Sie können das Buch auch über meine Adresse bestellen: peter.kiefer@purusha.de oder über die Adresse von Johannes (siehe Website). Im letzteren Fall bitte dazu schreiben: "Inspiriert durch Peter Kiefer". Danke! Der Preis über mich ist 17,50 Euro inkl. Versand.

Johannes A. Buchholz über Themen seines zweiten Buches (an dem er gerade arbeitet):

"Langlebigkeit - die 7 „Unsterblichen“ in der vedischen Literatur und ihre Methoden; der uralte Lebensstil, um den Segen des Höchsten zu sichern.

Wie man frühzeitigen Tod vermeiden kann - uralte physische Schutzmaßnahmen aus Ost und West; tägliche Zeremonien, die jeder (wie von Heiligen und Sehern empfohlen) durchführen kann und etwas Studium und Verbindung mit dem Höchsten auch intellektuell und vom Herzen her - Liebe.

Die nach ihrem „Tod“ körperlich unversehrt Gebliebenen in Ost und West – Ursachen und ihre Bedeutung für die Zukunft;

Empfehlungen von Sehern und Heiligen während der Entwicklung höherer Bewußtseinszustände; die Yoga Sutren des Patanjali mit der Unzerstörbarkeit des Körpers.

Unerklärliche Geheimnisse der heutigen Menschheit – vor langer Zeit schon in den ältesten Schriften enträtselt;

Die Reise der Seele - wie und von woher gelangt die Seele in den Körper; was geschieht mit der Seele beim Tod und danach; Struktur und Funktion des Jenseits und der Himmel; Seelen- und Weltenlehrer;

Wer regiert alle Universen und wie?; Bewußtsein und die Frau an der Spitze der Schöpfung;

Entstehung, Erhaltung und Auflösung der Universen.

Was erwartet uns in Kürze? - das neue Zeitalter – das Ende der dunklen Vorherrschaft; Sattva im kollektiven Bewußtsein, ein neuer Wissens- und Erfahrungsstrom für uns und unser Universum.

Unsere Vorfahren aus anderen physischen Welten; Besiedlung der Erde und des Kosmos u.v.m.

Ich werde an diesem Buch wahrscheinlich 1 Jahr lang schreiben, da ich nur nebenbei dazu komme. Denjenigen, die interessiert sind, meine vorläufigen Artikel zu diesen und anderen Themen zu erhalten und in der Lage sind, meine Tätigkeit mit einer monatlichen Spende zu unterstützen, schicke ich gerne alle paar Wochen eine Email. Dazu bitte anmelden.

Herzliche Grüße und alles Gute für Ihre Gesundheit !" J. A. Buchholz

Transcendental Meditation

with Questions and Answers

A5 size, 168 pages, round corners, guilded (high quality gold edges)

This book consists of two parts. Part One is a talk by Maharishi on Transcendental Meditation. Part Two consists of questions addressed to Maharishi by audiences attending his lectures and the answers given by Maharishi. These cover the period from March 1960 to mid 1961, when Maharishi held evening discourses in London, England. The questions and answers have been grouped under headings according to the topics discussed. (May 1967, Rishikesh)

Quote from the book:

‘There is an ever-increasing state of chaos in the world; tension increases daily in the individual, in social life, in national affairs, and international relations. The great and urgent need is for something to re-establish harmony in the individual human being and to give him peace; only from such an inner peace can wisdom and happiness be born. All that we call wisdom today, all knowledge, the whole process of endless fact-gathering must utterly fail to satisfy the real needs of man; for these real needs are called happiness, understanding, and wisdom, and they are not vain and unworldly aspirations but man's birthright.’—Maharishi, 1961, London

Table of Contents:

PART I: Transcendental Meditation

Life Is Joyful
How All Things Have Their Origin in Absolute Bliss Consciousness
The Absence of Enduring Happiness as a Common Experience
Why Does Man Suffer?
The Cure for Suffering
What Is Transcendental Meditation?
The Process of Transcendental Meditation
The Wandering Mind
Concentration Is Not the Way
The Way to Realisation through the Absolute-Attribute of the Divine
The Way to Realisation through the Consciousness-Attribute of the Divine
The Way to Realisation through the Bliss-Attribute of the Divine
The Development of Higher Consciousness

Unfoldment of Latent Faculties
Transcendental Meditation and Health
Transcendental Meditation and Education
The Ultimate Goal of Transcendental Meditation

PART II: Questions and Answers

Transcendental Meditation
- Experience of Transcendental Consciousness
- Life Becomes More Natural and Successful
- Timeless Tradition of Knowledge
- Gaining Bliss Consciousness
- Glorifying Life - Inner and Outer
- On Faith and Religion
- God Realisation
- Inner Happiness Gives Strength and Stability
- Transcendental Meditation and Its Benefits
- Transcendental Meditation is Universal—Beneficial to Everyone
- Complete Freedom in the State of Being
- Maintaining Connection with the Ocean of Happiness Within
Mantra - A Specific Sound and Its Value
Relationship between Mind and Body
Individual Has Free Will
Karma Is Cause and Effect
No Man Needs to Suffer - Life Is Bliss
Healing Is the Natural Result of Transcendental Meditation
Transcendental Meditation Is More Effective than Psychoanalysis
Transcendental Meditation Distinctly Different from Self-Hypnosis
The Role of an Enlightened Master (Teacher or Guide)

PART III: Appendices

A Glimpse of Maharishi's Achievements 1957- 2008, and continuing to the present
Library of Maharishi's Books

To place an order for this book, please contact:

Maharishi Ayurveda Products Europe B.V.
Postbus 8811
NL-6063 ZG Vlodrop, The Netherlands
Tel.: +31-0475-529111 • Fax: +31-475-404055
Email: map@ayurveda.nl • website: www.ayurveda.eu
25 € (+ shipping)
Maharishi International Publications Department (MIPD)
mipd@maharishi.ne

http://www.mumpress.com/books/other-authors/1tsa.html

Neues Buch von Dr. med. Ulrich Bauhofer

"In Balance leben: Wie wir trotz Stress mit unserer Energie richtig umgehen"

192 Seiten
Südwest Verlag (17. Juni 2013)
Sprache: Deutsch
ISBN-10: 3517088803
ISBN-13: 978-3517088808

Über das neue Buch:
Letztlich dreht sich im Leben alles um Energie. Genau aus diesem Grund ist ein effektives Energiemanagement so essenziell. Die meisten Menschen managen ihre Zeit und ihr Geld, aber wer schon managt seine Energie? Doch mit der Energie verhält es sich wie mit Geld. Wenn Sie fortwährend mehr ausgeben als Sie einnehmen, sind Sie irgendwann pleite. Energetisch insolvent. Das heißt erschöpft, ausgelaugt, ohne Antrieb und Motivation - nichts macht mehr wirklich Spaß.

Dieses Buch führt Sie in sechs Schritten zu einem wirksamen, personalisierten Energiemanagement und verknüpft dabei auf fesselnde, spannende und unterhaltsame Weise das jahrtausendealte Heilwissen des Ayurveda mit den Erfordernissen der modernen Zeit. Mit dem Ziel eines glücklichen, gesunden und erfüllten Lebens.

Bücher von Dr. Harald Maschler

1. Die Wissenschaft vom Glück — Prinzipien der Vedischen Wissenschaft zur nachhaltigen Verbesserung des individuellen und kollektiven Lebens — Analogien zwischen dem Veda und der modernen Naturwissenschaft

ISBN 978-3-00-026063-6, 336 Seiten, erschienen 1. März 2009 im Selbstverlag, 34.- € plus Versandkosten

Das Thema des Buches ist im Umfeld von theoretischer Physik und Spiritualität angesiedelt. Es schlägt eine Brücke zwischen Superstringtheorie, Relativitätstheorie und Urknalltheorie einerseits – und deren Beziehungen und Analogien zur Vedischen Wissenschaft.
Es mündet in die Erkenntnis des bekannten Superstringexperten Dr. John Hagelin, dass die Grundlage und der Ursprung der gesamten Schöpfung – Einheitliches Feld aller Naturgesetze genannt – und die in der TM durch den Meditierenden erfahrbare Transzendenz, ein und dasselbe sind. Daraus ergeben sich die bekannten, vielfach publizierten positiven Effekte der TM auf das tägliche Leben, die Gesundheit und das Schicksal des einzelnen Menschen, aber auch von Gesellschaften oder der ganzen Welt – und damit die beste, effektivste Methode zur Erzeugung von Weltfrieden. Maharishis Vedische Wissenschaft beschreibt in Theorie und Praxis, wie durch die Anwendung der TM, TM-Sidhis einschließlich des Yogischen Fliegens, Ayur Veda, Jyotish, Yagyas, Vedische Rezitationen wie MVVT oder MVST, oder Gandharva Veda das Leben der Menschen in allen Bereichen signifikant und nachhaltig verbessert wird.
Rezensionen zu dem Buch "DIE WISSENSCHAFT VOM GLÜCK" siehe http://www.amazon.de

2. Meisterschaft der Wunscherfüllung; mit Zitaten des Großen Sehers Maharishi Mahesh Yogi; Der Quantenphysiker Dr. John Hagelin erklärt das Prinzip der Vedischen Wunscherfüllung

ISBN 978-3-00-042732-9, erschienen im Oktober 2013 im Selbstverlag, DIN A 4, hardcover, 179 Seiten, Preis 30.- € plus 3,89.- Versandkosten in Deutschland

In diesem Buch wird erklärt, welche Bedingungen erfüllt werden müssen, damit Wunscherfüllung tatsächlich funktioniert - und warum es oft nicht funktioniert.

Der Mechanismus der Wunscherfüllung wird aus Sicht der Vedischen Wissenschaften - und aus Sicht der Quantenphysik erklärt:
U
nsere Realität, und damit auch die Erfüllung unserer Wünsche, sind nichts anderes als die verschiedenen Anregungen unseres tiefsten Bewusstseinsbereiches, dem Transzendentalen Bewusstsein. In der Transzendentalen Meditation (TM) wird dieser Bereich systematisch erfahren und so - gemäß den Erkenntnissen des Quantenphysikers Dr. John Hagelin - zu unserem eigenen Nutzen aktiviert. Die Naturwissenschaft nennt diesen Bereich das Einheitliche Feld, da hier alle Naturgesetze vereint sind und daraus hervorgehen - es ist die Basis der Schöpfung- vollkommende Kreativität.

Beide Bücher sind erhältlich beim Autor: harald.maschler@web.de

http://www.enlightenmentforeveryone.com

Enlightenment is for Everyone (Official Book Trailer)

www.youtube.com

www.enlightenmentforeveryone.com/ Let Your Soul Sing Enlightenment is for Everyone was published and launched on Dec. 10th 2012. Brief Transcript: Throughout...

Let Your Soul Sing

"A beautiful synthesis of heart and mind, this book is written from the personal and truthful perspective of an individual who has absorbed the depth and breadth of Maharishi's extraordinarily profound and practical knowledge. It reveals how growth toward enlightenment is expressed through tender, subjective experiences of the transcendent. It also shows how enlightenment may be understood from a completely objective scientific point of view as the progressive refinement and development of total neurophysiological functioning."

Let Your Soul Sing

"A beautiful synthesis of heart and mind, this book is written from the personal and truthful perspective of an individual who has absorbed the depth and breadth of Maharishi's extraordinarily profound and practical knowledge. It reveals how growth toward enlightenment is expressed through tender, subjective experiences of the transcendent. It also shows how enlightenment may be understood from a completely objective scientific point of view as the progressive refinement and development of total neurophysiological functioning."

~ Dr. Keith Wallace ~

Founding President and Trustee of Maharishi University of Management, Dean of the College of Perfect Health and Professor of Physiology, and author of The Neurophysiology of Enlightenment.

by Dr. Keith Wallace

"This book is a profound gift. Beautifully written, it gently opens our eyes to who we truly are and guides us in accessing the divine wisdom, peace and bliss within each one of us. Ann Purcell weaves the teachings of Maharishi with her personal journey to provide the keys to transformation."

~ Amy Hatkoff ~

Child and family advocate, parenting educator, filmmaker, and author of The Inner World of Farm Animals; You are My World: How a Parent's Love Shapes a Baby's Mind; and How To Save The Children.

"Let Your Soul Sing is a brilliant and simply written reflection on how to live a life of joy, balance, and wholeness. As such, it is a roadmap to personal fulfillment, creative expression, and a gentler, kinder, more balanced world.

While Let Your Soul Sing is for everyone, women in particular will find their own essential, divine, nourishing nature reflected back to them through this book."

~ Candace Badgett ~

Chairman of the Global Mother Divine Organization, President of the Global Health Foundation for Women, and Director of The Raj Ayurveda Health Center and Spa

Catching the Big Fish

http://www.amazon.de/Catching-Big-Fish-Meditation-Consciousness/dp/1585425400

by David Lynch

The Flow of Consciousness

$22.95 Code: G-04 320 pages, Softcover Published in 2010

Over the years, His Holiness Maharishi Mahesh Yogi recorded brilliant and inspiring lectures on the literary process, as well as on critical theory and technique, emphasizing the relevance of the state of consciousness of both writer and reader. This precious volume is a collection of many of those lectures recorded between 1971 and 1976.

Immersing oneself in the transcripts of Maharishi's lectures allows readers to feel his presence, to hear his voice, his rhythms of speech, his humor, and to appreciate his skill as a teacher. It is a journey through a great mind and an exploration of a topic familiar and beloved by all.

It was compiled, with extensive introductory material, by retired literature faculty members Rhoda Orme-Johnson and Susan Andersen.
The interview can also be heard in mp3 format on the KHOE website www.khoe.org <http://www.khoe.org>

By Rhoda F. Orme-Johnson, Ph.D. and Susan K. Anderson, Ph.D.

2011 - New Book on TM by world-renowned psychiatrist

TRANSCENDENCE: Healing and Transformation Through Transcendental Meditation (Tarcher/Penguin, 2011)

About the author

Norman Rosenthal, M.D., is a distinguished clinical professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical School. Dr. Rosenthal served for 20 years as a senior researcher at the National Institute of Mental Health. His research into seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and pioneering work in the use of light therapy has helped millions of people around the world.

Dr. Rosenthal’s newest book, TRANSCENDENCE: Healing and Transformation Through Transcendental Meditation (Tarcher/Penguin, 2011), explores the value of this ancient technique for healing and transformation.

By Norman Rosenthal, M.D.

Dr. Rosenthal’s broad-ranging book will appeal both to newcomers who want to know the basics of this ancient technique, as well as seasoned meditators wishing to broaden their knowledge and deepen their understanding about it.

By presenting a mix of fascinating stories, published research, and his own clinical and personal experience with the Transcendental Meditation program, Dr. Rosenthal illustrates the value of the TM program in promoting cardiac health, reducing anxiety and depression, and helping people suffering from traumatic stress and addiction.

Dr. Rosenthal emphasizes that the TM technique can especially help highly successful people to live fuller and richer lives. He illustrates this in interviews with prominent meditators like Paul McCartney, Martin Scorsese, Moby, Russell Brand, and Laura Dern.

Ayurvedische Heilkunst für den Westen

http://www.jpc.de/jpcng/books/detail/-/art/Ayurveda/hnum/1743992

Ayurveda - das ist jahrtausendealte Gesundheitspraxis und zeitlose Heilkunst. Dr. Ernst Schrott und Dr. Wolfgang Schachinger, zwei der bekanntesten Ayurveda-Ärzte in Europa, zeigen Ihnen, wie Sie mit dieser einzigartigen Heilmethode Ihre Gesundheit verbessern können. Denn gerade für den Stress des westlichen Alltags bietet Ayurveda den perfekten Ausgleich. Lernen Sie die Grundlagen und Anwendungen des Ayurveda kennen. Die Übungen, Rezepte und Anwendungen können Sie sofort für sich umsetzen.

Das fundierte Heilwissen des Ayurveda

- Einstieg: Erfahren Sie mehr über Ursprung und Geschichte des Ayurveda und über das vedische Weltbild.
- Methodenvielfalt: Von Jyothish, der vedischen Astrologie über Vaya Sthapan und Yoga, um den Körper jung und fit zu halten, bis hin zu Aroma- und Farbtherapie: Lernen Sie die wichtigsten Methoden des Ayurveda in Übungen und Rezepten kennen.

Herausgeber: Wolfgang Schachinger, Ernst Schrott

- Gezielte Prävention und Therapie bei Indikationen: Das große Therapiekapitel zeigt Ihnen für über 55 Beschwerden wie Herz-Kreislauf-Störungen, Erkältungskrankheiten oder Magen-Darm-Probleme, welche vedischen Methoden Sie einsetzen und kombinieren können.

Erleben Sie das reiche Wissen und die faszinierende Tradition des Ayurveda - begleitet von erfahrenen Praktikern.

EUR 34,99

Umfang: 368 Seiten
Auch verfügbar als eBook

Gehirnwellen für Frieden

http://www.nrhz.de/flyer/beitrag.php?id=17522

Von William T. Hathaway

Bücher von Georg Beutler

Katholische Kirche im Liche der Vedischen Weisheit

http://katholische-kirche-im-lichte.de/index.html

Die Römisch-katholische Kirche im Lichte göttlicher Weisheit

Band 2
Vedische Sicht

Das neue Buch von Georg Beutler geht am 20.11.2013 in Druck.

http://katholische-kirche-im-lichte.de/html/rom_-katholische_kirche_im_lichte_band_2.html

Georg schreibt: "In diesem Buch sind unter anderem alle Zitate von Maharishi gesammelt, die er jemals über das Christentum gesagt hat, glaub ich zumindest. Sollte jemand noch weitere kennen, bitte ich um Mitteilung; dann übernehme ich sie gerne in der Neuauflage.

Wer Interesse daran hat, das Buch rechtzeitig vor Weihnachten zu erhalten, möchte mir bitte bis 20.Nov. eine verbindliche Bestellung zukommen lassen.
http://katholische-kirche-im-lichte.de/html/rom_-kath__kirche_im_lichte__bestellung.html

Ich kann aus finanziellen Gründen immer nur jeweils 10 Exemplare drucken lassen, es sei denn, es gibt mehr Vorbestellungen mit vorheriger Überweisung. Vermutlich kann ich sie dann schon in der ersten Dezemberwoche versenden.

Ansonsten gilt: solange kein echter Verlag die Bücher veröffentlicht, betrachte ich sie im Werdungsprozess.

Jeder Korrekturvorschlag - vom Deutschen, von der Ausdrucksweise oder vom Inhalt an sich ist ist erwünscht und hat bis jetzt und wird weiterhin bei jeder Neuauflage seine entsprechenden Spuren hinterlassen. Ansonsten gilt auch: sollte jemand irgendwelche Sätze finden, die zu unsachlich etc. sind, im Widerspruch zur Bibel oder Maharishis Aussagen stehen oder überhaupt nicht stimmen, bin ich bereit zu widerrufen!
Lesermeinigen sind mir wichtig."
http://katholische-kirche-im-lichte.de/html/kirche_im_lichte_band_1__lesermeinung.html
Eventuelle Fragen werden hier beantwortet bzw. neu aufgenommen:
http://katholische-kirche-im-lichte.de/html/kirche_im_lichte_band_1__fragen.html

Manage the Manager

Das von den Autoren Dr. Günther Hermann und Matthias Hermann verfasste Buch „Manage the Manager“ steht für die fundamental neue Idee, das Master-Management der Natur sich unmittelbar nutzbar zu machen. Dieses Master-Management der Natur ist das intelligenteste, kreativste und erfolgreichste Management. Es dirigiert über 100 Milliarden Galaxien. Allein in unserer Heimatgalaxie lenkt es etwa 100 Milliarden Sonnensysteme. Wie alles andere im Universum sind auch wir Ausdruck dieses präzisen Managements. Etwa 7 Millionen unserer ca. 100.000 Milliarden Zellen produzieren wir jede einzelne Sekunde neu. Was unser Körper kann, ist auch unserem Geist möglich, wenn er sich in dieses System integriert. Das Erfolgsgeheimnis von Business-Excellence basiert auf der Nutzung dieses Master-Managements, das in unserem Bewusstsein latent vorhanden und mittels der mentalen Technik der Transzendentalen Meditation verfügbar ist.

von Matthias Hermann und Dr. Günther Hermann

Das gedruckte Buch ist unter der ISBN: 978-3-8491-2464-9 im Buchhandel zum Preis von 16,90 EUR erhältlich, das E-Book unter ISBN 978-3-8491-2500-4 zum Preis von 9,90 EUR. Hier ist der Link zu Amazon: MANAGE THE MANAGER: BUSINESS-EXCELLENCE DURCH DAS MASTER-MANAGEMENT DER NATUR

oder http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/3849124649?ie=UTF8&camp=1638&creative

ASIN=3849124649&linkCode=xm2&tag=cohetimemaga-21
http://www.amazon.com/MANAGE-THE-MANAGER-BUSINESS-EXCELLENCE-MASTER-MANAGEMENT/dp/3849124649#reader_B00AMNGB3K

Maria-Eich-Str. 34 | D-82166 Gräfelfing
Postfach 600303 | D-81203 München
T +49 (0)89 82086210
F +49 (0)89 82086211
M +49 (0)151 58810752
mh@matthiashermann.com

2013 - SCIENCE OF VEDIC YOGA

700 Seiten, DIN A4 FORMAT

Verkaufspreis Euro 69,-

Die Wissenschaft des Vedischen Yoga basiert auf dem traditionellen Wissen der alten Rishis und Maharishis sowie auf den neuesten Erkennt-nissen der modernen Wissenschaft. Das Ziel von Yoga ist, Einheit auf allen Ebenen des Lebens zu etablieren. Die Wissenschaft des Vedischen Yoga lehrt, daß der Körper Ausdruck des Bewußtseins ist. Deshalb formt sich jede asana - durch eine zarte Absicht - aus dem Bewußtsein heraus in die Richtung, die durch den Namen der asana vorgegeben ist. Dieses Fließen des Bewußtseins aktiviert die Vitalenergie und den Atem undbewegt die Wirbelsäule und den Körper in eine bestimmte Position.

Wenn wir die asanas auf diese Weise praktizieren, werden die asanas zu Yoga Asanas und Geist, Atem und Körper werden als Einheit erfahren.

Yoga wird so zu einer Meditation in Bewegung. Zweck des vorliegenden Buches ist es, uns auf das höchste Ziel des Lebens vorzubereiten - den Zustand der Erleuchtung (kaivalya).

von JADRANKO MIKLEC, ehemaliger Nationaler Leiter von Kroatien und ein Experte auf demGebiet des Yoga

SCIENCE OF VEDIC YOGA enthält folgende Kapitel:

- Yoga Philosophie und Yoga Psychologie

- Yogischer Lebensstil - Anatomie und Physiologie

- Asanas

- Pranayama

- Reinigungsverfahren - Yoga Shuddhi Kriyas

- Yoga Therapie - der therapeutische Ansatz der Asanas und des Pranayama

- Meditation

- Ayurveda

- Yoga und Ayurveda im Bereich des Sports

- Die Methodologie des Lehrens

- Verschiedene Yoga-Systeme

Das Buch können Sie bestellen bei Edith Brigitta Junk, Tel.-Nr. 07220 / 98 99 55

TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION: THE ESSENTIAL TEACHINGS OF MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI
BOOK EXCERPT

Introduction:

Meeting Maharishi

University of California, Berkeley—November 8, 1966.

A cold wind was rushing up from San Francisco Bay and climbing toward the hills. Huddling against the chill, I noticed some posters still up around campus as I hurried to enter California Hall. When I arrived, the talk had already begun. The large lecture hall was so packed that dozens of people overflowed into the corridor and, like them, I had to listen to the presentation over a loudspeaker.

The speaker’s musical voice, with its slight Indian accent, was soft yet full of life, calm but extremely expressive. He was talking about life in contemporary society, noting that “as the rate of progress increases, as the pace of life becomes faster and man’s aspirations expand to the moon and the stars, the responsibilities and pressures of life naturally become greater.” But, he pointed out, our capabilities are not expanding at an equivalent rate. “Because people have not been able to find sufficient energy and creative intelligence within themselves to meet the demands of life . . . frustration, unhappiness, and lack of fulfillment are increasingly common.”

The speaker likened the situation to living in a building in which the walls have begun to crack. If the building is to continue to stand, the foundations have to be strengthened. He proposed the technique of Transcendental Meditation (TM) as a way to restore balance, to give strength and dignity back to human life. He described TM as a simple method by which any individual could tap into the inner source of thought, a “reservoir of unlimited energy, intelligence, power, peace, and bliss” deep within the mind. When a person utilizes this field of unlimited potential, he said, “all aspects of his life flourish, in the same way that the branches, fruits, and leaves of a tree flourish when the roots maintain contact with the field of nourishment in the soil.”

Then he took his vision one step further, beyond the individual, and it was this final point that captured my full attention. When people meditate, he said, the deep inner peace they experience creates what he referred to as “a warm air” around them, an influence of harmony and positivity. If enough people in society produced such a harmonious atmosphere, negativity and stress in the environment could be reduced or even eliminated, and world peace could become a reality.

Even as a young man, I had never been nearly as interested in my own happiness as in the well-being of the world, and along with many others, I had done what I could to serve that cause, but clearly it wasn’t working. It was the late ’60s, there were riots in the streets of American cities, the Vietnam war was killing thousands of people and dividing the country, the Cold War was raging between the U.S. and the USSR (two nuclear-armed superpowers), crime rates were high, and nobody knew what to do about any of it. When I heard the speaker’s persuasive argument—which boiled down to the simple statement that individuals who are at peace within themselves create a peaceful world—it made complete sense to me.

It was a beautiful message, and the audience—even those of us standing in the corridor who had not been able to see the speaker—listened intently. After a while, a few people started to leave the hall, and I was finally able to get to the door and catch my first glimpse of His Holiness Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, sitting cross-legged on the stage on a couch neatly draped with white silk.

Small in stature, with long dark hair and a beard just beginning to turn gray, wearing traditional white silk robes, the Maharishi moved and spoke with an extraordinary combination of gentleness and strength. His words were carefully chosen and his speech, although simple, was highly articulate. He had a quick and lively wit and a hearty laugh.

One thing was obvious: He was a happy man. Serene. At peace with himself and the world. He answered every question posed to him—some hostile, discourteous, provoking—with patience and answered thoughtfully and thoroughly. Here was a man who was sensitive to the suffering and confusion of modern life, who could understand it and explain it, yet somehow remain unfazed by it.

At one moment, while discussing a point of philosophy, his intellect seemed to dominate; his voice rose, his bright, clear eyes flashed, and his hands moved quickly and decisively. Answering a different question, he was the embodiment of love, his fingers caressing the petals of a rose, his voice soft and full. He seemed complete in himself, yet totally alert and responsive to those around him.

The Maharishi answered every question in terms of the technique of Transcendental Meditation. He outlined the physiological effects of its practice, explained the principles behind it, and showed the relevance of the technique to whatever specific problems, individual, social, or global, concerned the questioner. He emphasized that he was not espousing philosophy or religion, or offering something to “believe in” or accept on faith. Rather, he said, TM is a practical technique, based on verifiable, scientifically validated principles. It is easy to learn, and has immediate and practical benefits for all aspects of life. And, although it was obvious that it was he who was bringing this message to the world, the Maharishi took no credit for himself, but expressed gratitude to his teacher for passing on to him this “wisdom

of living the fullness of life.”

These were my first impressions of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. My first impression of Transcendental Meditation, gained a few weeks later when I took the course offered by the Students International Meditation Society, was that everything he had said was true.

Although I knew almost nothing about it at the time, the movement that had grown up around Maharishi was already international in scope. After thirteen years with his spiritual master followed by two years of seclusion in the “Valley of Saints” in the Himalayas, he had traversed the globe each year, starting in 1957, opening centers

throughout Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas, and the technique of Transcendental Meditation that he taught was becoming increasingly well known. But in the summer of 1967, something was to happen that would change the course of history, for myself as well as millions of others.

I was in New York that summer, working for my uncles’ hardware company, installing fences throughout the city as a helper with their work crews. One muggy August afternoon after work, when I returned to the apartment I was sharing, I picked up the newspaper, and on the front page was a photograph of Maharishi with the phenomenally popular musical group, The Beatles. When I took one look

at that picture, I said aloud, “My God, it’s all going to change!”

And it did. The TM movement had been, up to that point, a small and intimate thing. Those who were involved in it pretty much all knew one another, and when Maharishi came to town, they could spend some time with him. But with the advent of the Beatles, suddenly thousands, and then tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands of young people became interested, and lines formed outside TM centers on weekends to learn the practice.

When I moved to Los Angeles that autumn to continue my education, I began to write this book. I created a questionnaire asking people about their experiences with TM, which I placed in centers where TM was taught, and a surprising number of responses began to roll in. All were enthusiastic, and many were quite detailed in describing the wonderful experiences people were having and the changes and

virtual transformations in their relationships, performance at school and work, health, and happiness. I felt, from my own experience, the benefits of meditation, but these responses encouraged me to pursue the rather fantastical idea of creating a book.

I read whatever I could get hold of, which was very little—only Maharishi’s two works, Science of Being and Art of Living, and his newly published Translation and Commentary on the Bhagavad Gita. Not one of the hundreds of scientific research studies that have come out since then had been published. Most of the material in the first draft of the book was created from my reading of Maharishi’s books, from

the replies to my questionnaire and follow-up interviews with some of the respondents, and the tremendous inspiration and knowledge I gained by attending every lecture given by Jerry Jarvis, the national director of the TM movement.

Jerry was an eloquent spokesman for Maharishi, and a deeply devoted student of his teacher. Not only did I attend every talk that Mr. Jarvis offered in the Los Angeles area, whether introductory or advanced, but within a few months I joined a team of young people who had begun to speak about the benefits of TM at colleges and universities in the area. One of these individuals was Keith Wallace, a graduate student at UCLA who would soon publish pioneering studies on the physiological effects of TM in three distinguished scientific journals: Science (the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science), Scientific American, and the American Journal of Physiology.

In the summer of 1968, I attended a program in Squaw Valley, California, 6,000 feet high in the Sierra Nevadas, conducted by Maharishi as the first phase in training teachers of TM. About 750 people were in attendance. I brought with me the fledgling manuscript I was working on, with the desire to give it to him to look at. I soon discovered that he rarely read anything himself, but would reserve the transmission of information for a relationship with his students. Someone would read to him, and he would comment. Others would listen and learn from these interactions.

So, my desire transmuted to an attempt to read some or all of my book to Maharishi. I tried to arrange a meeting through his secretaries and assistants, but somehow it never happened. On the final night of the course, I stayed up until the wee hours of the morning (as Maharishi did every night), and at somewhere between three and four o’clock, when he finished his last meeting in the lecture hall and was walking through the dining room toward his own quarters, followed by a train of people trying to get close enough to ask questions as he made his way among the tables and chairs, I stood directly in front of him with my manuscript and boldly said, “Maharishi, I’m writing a book about TM.”

He stopped—as he had nowhere else to go—and replied, “Very good!” Then he added, “What is your profession?”

“I’m still a student.”

“What is your course of study?”

“Religion and philosophy.”

“Then you must include a good chapter about religion!”

“May I show you some of the book?” I asked him.

“When it’s fi nished. Meanwhile, you can speak to Jerry about it.”

And that was the extent of the meeting. But I felt inspired by Maharishi’s interest, and was excited about the prospect of sharing it with him and seeking his blessing for it when it was complete.

In the autumn of 1968, shortly after my 25th birthday, I moved to Ohio, where I’d decided to finish my undergraduate studies. During that year, as I had already accumulated a large number of credits in my major, I was permitted to do a significant amount of independent study. One of these courses involved completing the manuscript for this book. I believe my professors must have thought it quite unusual to have a student proposing to write a 350- or 400-page manuscript for three units of credit, but they gave me the opportunity, and I managed to do it. Toward the end of the year, I decided to switch from my focus on religion and philosophy. I applied to a Masters in Fine Arts (MFA) writing program at Ohio University, and received a graduate assistantship.

In my first semester there, in the fall of 1969, interest in TM began to boom in the Midwest, but there were no teachers living in the area. I had such a strong desire to share the benefits of meditation with others that I took it upon myself to organize and offer introductory talks at universities in a number of different cities. In some of these places, my talk was the first ever given on TM. All the posters had a picture of Maharishi on them, advertising a talk on “Transcendental Meditation as taught by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi,” and I suspect that sometimes the audience must have been disappointed to find that the speaker was a graduate student wearing a jacket and tie, rather than a bearded, white-robed yogi from the Himalayas.

Those lectures were frequently attended by 200, 300, or 400 people. And I, a completely untrained speaker who wasn’t even a TM teacher, found myself alone onstage in front of those groups in large auditoriums and lecture halls. Looking back on it now, I find it hard to believe that I had the courage to do it, or that the leadership of the TM movement in the U.S. had the confidence in me to allow it. In any case, interest in TM was very high; large courses were held in all those cities, and I found myself returning to each place to meet with the new and continuing meditators, to offer advanced lectures on Maharishi’s teachings.

It was my deepest desire to become a teacher of Transcendental Meditation. In fact, on that January day in Berkeley when I received my initial instruction, in the midst of the process I turned to my teacher and asked, “How does one become a teacher of this?”

He replied, “We can discuss that later. Right now let’s just continue learning.” Which we did. But that desire stayed with me, and grew. It was fueled by my own growing happiness, which I wanted to share with others; by what I’d seen in the people I met who were visibly transformed by their TM practice; and perhaps most of all, by the potential I saw for a better world if large numbers of people could enjoy the benefits of meditation.

So I was thrilled, during the Thanksgiving vacation of 1969 in Ohio, when I received a phone call from Jerry Jarvis, the national director. It went something like this:

“Hi, Jack, this is Jerry.”

“Hi, Jerry.”

“What are you doing in January?”

Long pause.

“Yes! I want to go!”

Laughter. “Good! We’ll take care of the costs.”

I had just been invited to go to India to study with Maharishi, and train to become a teacher. What had held me back up to that point was the money: the round-trip fare to India, and the cost of the teacher-training course itself, which I had never looked into, believing I couldn’t afford it. When the exultation diminished enough for me to think clearly, I realized that I had signed an agreement to be a graduate student, receive a fellowship stipend, and teach classes for the duration of my time at the university. I had every intention and desire to go to India, but wasn’t sure if I would be able to do so. So I went to the graduate advisor and presented my case like this:

“I love my classes, and I’ve enjoyed teaching. But I’ve just had an offer to study in India with a great spiritual master, and I would really like to do it. I also want to pursue my career at the university. What do you think I should do?”

The professor gazed at me with an incredulity that I misinterpreted at first. “There’s absolutely no question about it,” he said, and I knew the ax was about to fall, that he was about to say, “How can you even consider something so irresponsible as going off to India when you have such a generous fellowship here, and an opportunity to advance your career?” But what I heard was: “The university will always be here. You can always go to graduate school. If you have a chance to go to India and study, how can you even think twice about it?”

I laughed and said, “Oh, all right then, so you would approve?”

“Absolutely! And have a great time. Stop by to tell me about it when you get back.”

Early in January 1970, I found myself arriving at the New Delhi airport, about to begin one of the great adventures of my life. In my suitcase was the first draft of this book, which I’d completed in my final undergraduate year, and then hadn’t looked at again.

I spent the next three months in Maharishi’s academy in the foothills of the Himalayas, across the Ganges from the ancient pilgrimage town of Rishikesh, on a bluff overlooking the great river. The opportunity to meet with such a brilliant, wise, and compassionate teacher three times a day is something one probably doesn’t fully appreciate while it was happening. In a completely effortless way, without strain, I sat in front of Maharishi with 176 others from around the world, and absorbed the knowledge so patiently and systematically—and yet spontaneously—offered by this great sage. He used no notes, had no books piled up for reference on the small table in front of him, and showed no videos, slides, or PowerPoints. Rather, for three months, he just talked, and answered all our questions, both practical (about the procedures of teaching, for example) and spiritual/philosophical. It was an awesome display of knowledge.

The word rishi means sage or seer, one who sees deeply into the truth of life, and particularly into the truth of the Veda, the knowledge of life that is expressed in the Vedic literature of India. The term maharishi is reserved for the greatest rishis (maha means great) who not only “see,” but who also embody the knowledge and from the deep compassion of their hearts offer it to others so that their lives may be

enriched.

And what is the knowledge that they embody and convey? That within every one of us lies a vast and largely untapped reservoir of energy, intelligence, happiness, and peace that is our very own deepest, truest self—and that if we can come into conscious contact and attunement with it, our lives will be transformed. We will no longer need to constantly look for happiness and security in other people or in our activities and achievements; we will no longer be tossed about by the ever-changing ups and downs of experience in the world; instead, we will live a life centered in peace and contentment.

During my free hours at the academy, I would haul a chair up to the flat roof of the one-story building I lived in. I brought my manuscript and, amidst the chatter of monkeys and the eerie call of peacocks in the breezy spring afternoons, based on the knowledge I was receiving, began to make serious revisions, deepening the presentation to match the deepening understanding that was growing within me.

I don’t really remember how much I was able to complete during the time in India, as the intensity of the course increased as time went on, both in terms of our personal experiences of meditation, and the lectures as well as the smaller training and practice groups that evolved to help us learn. We met in groups every afternoon to practice lecturing and, more important, to master the subtle art of meditation instruction so that we could lead students through the many types of experiences for which they might need explanations and guidance.

We also gradually increased the number of hours spent in meditation, many of us doubling the minimum of four to six hours we had been sitting each day. At one point in the middle of the course, we had a 72-hour meditation. Maharishi told us to take three pieces of fruit to our room; we were to sit, and not lie down, for 72 hours; to meditate straight through—but to eat one piece of fruit each day, in the daytime, so we would know how many days had gone by! The depth of silence and expanded awareness that many of us experienced (and later reported when we returned to our meetings on the fourth day) was profoundly fulfilling.

At the end of the course, I put my manuscript back in my suitcase and forgot about it, as I immediately became involved full-time in the work of teaching and organizing. I had intended to go to California to work with Jerry Jarvis at the national headquarters, but passing through New York, I stopped to visit the new TM center in Greenwich Village. The center leader asked if I would consider taking over the center for one month while he went to an advanced course for teachers in Europe. Glad for the opportunity to immediately begin teaching, I agreed.

He never returned, and I found myself the head of the New York City center, and within a short time, the Area Coordinator for New York and New Jersey, offering courses, lectures, and weekend and longer in-residence courses for thousands of meditators. I also coordinated the activities of the hundreds of teachers who began, over the next couple of years, to return from training courses given by Maharishi in Europe. The number of interested students far exceeded the capacity of the academy in India, so arrangements were made for off-season rentals of hotels in such lovely places as Mallorca, Spain, where those desiring to be trained as teachers could be housed at a reasonable cost.

By this time, I’d developed a strong desire to work more closely with Maharishi. In 1971, when he passed through New York, I had a few moments to speak privately with him. I asked him two things. First, when he inquired about how I was doing, I replied, “I’m doing well, but there are still some moments when I don’t feel completely happy or smooth in my behavior.”

He smiled and said, “It will only happen when you’re tired.”

Looking back on this, I can barely believe the naïveté I presented to him, a young Westerner who’d practiced meditation for all of four years, expecting to be perfectly at peace and living in eternal bliss! And I marvel, in retrospect, at Maharishi’s ability not to burst out laughing! Nevertheless, his answer has proven to be, over 40 years, precisely true. If I am even reasonably rested, I do feel content, peaceful, and able to deal with whatever comes my way.

But the more important question I got to ask him was: “Maharishi, I would like to come and be with you at the international headquarters.”

He looked at me intently and said, “But who will be in New York?”

I immediately listed half a dozen teachers who, in my opinion, were fully capable of running the center. And then with great tenderness and sweetness, he said again, “But who will be in New York?” I understood that he wanted me to stay, and I accepted that.

During the following year, I managed to complete another revision of my book. But not knowing anything about publishing, I simply put the manuscript in a drawer and left it there. One day I woke up with the thought, It’s time to do something with the manuscript. And then something happened that will make any would-be author envious. That morning at the TM center, I asked the first person who came in the door: “You wouldn’t happen to know anything about publishing, or have any contacts with any publishing companies, would you?”

She said, “I do know one editor, at E. P. Dutton,” at that time one of the larger American publishers. She kindly gave me the name of that person.

Later in the day when I had a moment, I called E. P. Dutton, asked for the editor, and said, “I’ve written a book about Transcendental Meditation. Would you be interested in seeing it?”

She said, “I would be very interested!”

I said, ‘I’ll send it to you.”

“Could you possibly bring it over?”

Within a few days, I had a signed contract for my book to be published.

At this point, I’d been working on the book entirely on my own. Only one person had read it, and that was Jerry Jarvis, who’d read through it and had made a few small suggestions. But I felt: This is Maharishi’s teaching, and this is the first book being published about TM; he should have a chance to read it and correct any errors I might have made, or give it his approval.

So I took a leave from my work and went to Europe, where Maharishi was conducting another large teacher-training course. I brought my manuscript with me, and there I was again able to have a private meeting with him in his room. And the most wonderful thing happened. Holding my manuscript in my hands, I said, “Maharishi, I finished my book, and I have a contract to publish it. I would like you

to hear it.”

He asked, “Are you satisfied with it?”

I could not lie about it. I had rewritten the book five times. Each draft was completely new. I’m quite certain there was not a single sentence left over from the first version. I had labored with all the love and intelligence in my being to make every phrase, sentence, and paragraph in the book truthful and clear. So I told him, “Yes, I am satisfied with it. But, it’s your teaching. I would like you to be satisfied

with it.”

“Then we’ll hear it!”

I said, “Good. May I read it to you?”

He looked at me and asked again, “But are you satisfied with it?”

Again I told him, “Yes, I am.”

“Then it’s all right.”

The way he said that was so definitive, and so deeply appreciative, that I felt he knew the labor I had put in, the effort I’d made to be sure that every aspect of his teaching was presented accurately, and I felt, All right. It’s okay.

So then I brought up my second point. “Maharishi, I want to offer your movement all the money I receive for the book.”

“No,” he said. “You keep it.”

I had been firm in my desire to not accept money for the book. I wanted to give it to Maharishi to further his work. So I argued. “I really want to give it to the movement.”

He looked at me and said simply, “You keep it.”

Yet a third time, I insisted, “I don’t need it. I have all that I need.”

He told me, “You keep it. You’ll need it.”

I had heard it said that it is not permissible, once a master tells you something three times, to argue. So I simply dropped the point. And it turned out that I would need that money!

In the summer of 1972, a one-month TM teacher-training course was held at Humboldt State University in California, near one of the world’s last great stands of giant redwood trees. I went for some rest and the chance to spend extra hours in deep meditation, but Maharishi immediately put me to work creating materials that were to be used throughout the world in a new course he was developing, called the Science of Creative Intelligence (SCI). This was a detailed analysis of the nature and unfoldment of consciousness, uniting the modern, scientific, objective approach with the ancient, subjective but equally rigorous approach of the Vedas. By the time the Humboldt course was drawing to a close, I had not quite finished my work, so I went to him, materials in hand, prepared to turn them over to someone else to complete.

“Maharishi, I haven’t finished editing the SCI texts. But it’s time for me to return to New York.” I was very conscious of the fact that he had directed me to stay in New York only a year previously. But this time he surprised me by asking, “Why go to New York?”

I burst out laughing, and he laughed, too. It was at that moment that my years of working closely with him as part of his international staff, and helping him to train teachers, would begin.

But that’s another story.